Building future archives –– Decolonizing culture(s) of remembrance

With Nesindano Namise

Zoom Meeting ID: 811 4361 6679

Do. 24.06.21 | 20:00 | online 19:45

_EN

In the previous sessions of Public Research we discussed the multiplicity of crises that shape our world, reading Isabell Strangers’ In Catastrophic Times. Resisting the Coming Barbarism. we looked at crises from environmental and social perspectives. Last months session we returned to the body (and its crises): Together with Yael Friedman we explored questions evolving around the concept of the patient from biological and ethical perspectives, as well as the concept of recovery regarding medical holism and epistemic injustice.
 
In this upcoming session of Public Research we will continue with the body and its crises shifting the perspective to artistic strategies of decoloniality. With our Namibian guest – performance poet and vocalist/writer Nesindano Namise we will talk about her artistic approach and research on the entanglement of coloniality, identity and culture(s) of remembrance. Through her performances in which she works with experimental music and sound Nesindano challenges prevailing narratives around questions of restitution and remembrance. She describes her artistic approach as ‚aural history‘ –– a way of exploring identity through experimental aural spheres and sound as a somatic decolonising experience. Following Nesindano’s presentation of her current artistic research we will open up the discussion along the questions of how these practices can be part of building future archives and cultures of remembering the traumatic repercussions of colonialism.
 
Nesindano Namise  is currently a recipient of the Namibian residency programme by Akademie Schloss Solitute and also a resident for Flausen+  2021. Her current projects focus on stories of “aural history”, Namibia-German colonial past and exploring Afro-futurism. She is well known for her multilingual and improvisational approach to her music/sound scaping in her mother tongue, Khoekhoegowab, English and Afrikaans. Nesindano is the co-organiser of Spoken Word Namibia an influential platform, which has largely impacted a large part of Windhoek’s contemporary performance spaces. Her content speaks of resilience, identity and expression through personal, collective or isolated stories and highlights creating enabling spaces for women, indigenous and queer people.
 
Foto: Jasmine Schädler
 

Thinking-acting against the catastrophe: Reading Isabelle Stengers

gesellschaften | public research_online

Zoom Meeting ID: 896 8633 8433

Do. 22.04.21 | 20:00 | online 19:45

_EN

 

This month we will continue our collective research on the Anthropocene and the catastrophes that shape our world. We will take up the multiple questions and discussions brought at last month to our series by Mira Hirtz. Her use of somatic techniques proposed way to engage in an experiential way with the current state of the world. By engaging in a philosophical reading for our next session we will take a different angle but stay with the same questions: How to act in and with world that is shaped by the entanglement of multiple crisis? How to act from the widths of this catastrophic milieu, in a thinking-acting way?

 

Together we will read and discuss excerpts of Isabelle Stengers’ In Catastrophic Times. Resisting the Coming Barbarism (2015). Isabelle Stengers’ is one of the leading philosophers on a thinking of the climate catastrophe the current capitalist condition as well as a critique of the mode of thought they impose. But instead of limiting her work to a critical reflection, she offers us a great deal of conceptual tools for living and thinking otherwise. Join us in thinking and discussing collectively the propositions this important text makes!

 

You can find the book here: http://openhumanitiespress.org/books/download/Stengers_2015_In-Catastrophic-Times.pdf

Entanglements of matter : unknown folds, sensate space and breathing things

gesellschaften | public research_online

 
Mira Hirtz

Zoom Meeting ID: 870 5349 3809

Do. 18.03.21 | 20:00 | online 19:45

_EN
 
Me and the thing, you and the object, we here and them there…it is an old question that keeps coming back around: How do we, human-beings, relate to the world? The century of the Anthropocene, proclaimed in the year 2000, highlights this question too: it challenges us to question the dominating categories of animate and inanimate matter in favour for a network of human and non-human beings. How can we grasp this network? How can we attend to the entanglement of these different kinds of matter? Since a few years, Mira has been researching a somatic approach towards this question, claiming that it does not only need philosophical and geopolitical investigation, but that it also needs to be addressed by our bodies. 

A somatic approach offers playful sensorial, movement- and experience-based tools to explore and imagine entangled relationships – and thereby expands the common understanding of academic research. Mira is continuously reflecting on how to bridge the variety of different research approaches and she would like to invite you to a collective experimental session. She will share her research practice combining somatics, deep reading of theoretical texts and performative artworks. We will collage those methods and look into selected texts by amongst others Karen Barad and Bruno Latour, explore movement with and perception of objects, practice free writing and share discussion. There is no movement-experience needed and the shared tasks will be adjustable to all needs. You only need to bring your curiosity! 

Mira Hirtz (*1991) imagines in different media and situations, what the value of creativity is for people and ecology. She bases her research on somatic techniques and positions her work in the context of critical eco-somatics, experimenting with performance, perception and movement as means to generate and mediate knowledge about sensate matter. The fact that she graduated from creative dance at Trinity Laban Conservatoire London and Art History and Media Philosophy at the HfG Karlsruhe has shaped her practice, as well as her work as a freelance art mediator and curator. She is currently involved in the “Critical Zones” project at ZKM Karlsruhe, where the museum turns into a rehearsal space in analogue and virtual ways.

For more information, see https://mirahirtz.de

The Blossoming Meadows Between Kuwait and Mohamarrah. الرياض المزهرة بين الكويت والمحمرة

gesellschaften | public research

 
public research_online

Do. 18.02.21 | 20:00 | online 19:45

 Zu Gast: Zahra Ali Baba (Kuweit) 

https://us02web.zoom.us/j/88415055934

Meeting ID: 884 1505 5934

Feb 18, 2021 07:45 PM Amsterdam, Berlin, Rome, Stockholm, Vienna

Do. 18.02.21 | 20:00 | online 19:45

This ongoing research attempts to revisit the transboundary traditions of architecture with a focus on Khaz’ali architectural patronage and the network of palaces spreading across Kuwait, Basrah and Mohamarrah, bringing to the foreground social geographies, diplomatic representation, and the underlying 18th Century narratives of a region on the verge of discovering oil. 
 
As the shift to oil based economy escalated a parallel shift from security alliances to border demarcation, these transformations marked the beginning of the end of a fluid cultural contact historically imprinted in the material culture of the northern part of the Gulf; a battlefield for consequent wars in the late 20th Century that left the region in a vulnerable state, and the Persian-Arab identities at constant opposition.
 
During the talk, we will explore an interpretive restoration strategy for Qasr Khaz’al Al Ka’abi, located in Dasman, Kuwait City, tracing the evolution of foreign policy in Kuwait as embodied in the building culture preceding the embassy as a typology, in an attempt to provide an alternative reading of the petroleum-scape in the upper Gulf region.
 
Bio: Zahra Ali Baba is an architect specialized in the conservation of cultural heritage in Kuwait and its wider regional context. Having curated Kuwait’s first national participation at the International Architecture Exhibition, La Biennale di Venezia 2012, her involvement in realizing Kuwait Pavilion continued as a commissioner (from 2014 – 2021) dedicating the pavilion to emerging critical thought in architecture. Zahra has been a delegate of cultural heritage at the UNESCO World Heritage Committee since 2011, working on 20th century patrimony in Kuwait, in addition to the vernacular building traditions of the pre-oil societies, with a focus on Khaz’ali architectural heritage in the northern part of the Gulf.
 
 
Image Credits: Opening Ceremony of Kuwait National Museum at Diwan Khaz’al, 1957.
Courtesy of KNM Archives. 

Darake

Veranstaltung_online | Zoom Meeting | Vierte Welt

 
Darake

Thursday 17.12.2020 | 20:00 – 23:00

Mit Afsun Moshiry

Meeting ID: 849 3054 8936

_EN

Water consumption is an important issue in Iran. The Darake river originates in the Alborz mountain range and runs through Tehran to the southern outskirts of the city. Due to the high seasonality of rain in Tehran, in some seasons the river is almost completely dried out and in other seasons it flows down the mountains and into the city with full strength.

In the December session of Public Research the film curator, producer, and director Afsun Moshiry will present raw materials and sketches of a video installation she currently has been working on. Her guiding question in this context is: How to capture the river in an artistic dimension and to further explore its philosophical meanings? Her images show water flowing down from North to South, collections of plastic garbage assembling on its surface, and various relationalities between geographical and geopolitical sites alike. They tell the story of human and more-than-human interactions from the very perspective of the water. 

In her presentation Afsun Moshiry will invite us to join her on a journey through Tehran via its waterways – sparking ideas and thoughts about the city and its inhabitants. Together with our guest we will discuss about possible translations of her source material into different media and the spatial arrangement of her planned video installation in general. The session is addressed to both artists and scholars: Let’s think together about different directions Darake might take in its finalized form and what kind of layers it already consists of.

Afsun Moshiry is based between Berlin and Tehran.

http://www.roadriverfilms.com

Devised by: Dirk CieslakGerko EgertStefan Hölscher, and Netta Weiser.

Public Research is part of the program gesellschaften in the new and beautiful House of Commons, designed by Olf Kreisel at Vierte Welt.

With support of Senatsverwaltung für Kultur und Europa, Berlin.

Radio-Choreography

E-Mail Reservation: Thurs. 15.10.2020                

Thursday 15.10.2020 | 18:00 – 22:00 | Free admisson

For all events, including those for which admission is free, a binding reservation is required, stating name and telephone number or e-mail address.

Tested, inspected and under hygiene conditions we meet again face to face in the House of Commons. Not before mid-November will we have the technical requirements for a sensible combination (hybrid) between face to face and online participation.

We are no longer allowed to offer the traditional dinner. Please bring your own sandwiches.

Radio-Choreography

We are happy to launch the new season of Public Research at Vierte Welt with the work of choreographer Netta Weiser. 

  Radio-Choreography is an artistic research exploring radio as a site for choreographic creation as well as an archival space, with a focus on dance practices created by female choreographers during times of migration.  Elaborating radio’s abilities to cross borders and amplify marginalized narratives, this research explores the transmission of dance works by contemporary choreographers working between the Middle-East and Europe, as well as traces of border crossing found at the margins of the Deutsches Tanzarchiv Köln.

Radio-Choreography is an invitation to recalibrate our senses and listen to dance. We turn to the ghostly space of radio as an alternative site for choreographic knowledge production, as a means to connect while acknowledging gaps and explore the poetics of displacement which are inscribed in our bodies.

In this public research event Netta Weiser will share excerpts of the research process and invisible dances with the public. Stay tuned.

Radio Choreogrpahy is devised by: Fransien Van der Putt, Miriam Schickler, Anna Leon, Dominique Tegho, Azadeh Nichliani, Mriam Althammer, Julia Turbahn and Netta Weiser.

This research is supported by Fonds Darstellende Künste and NRWKultur Sekretariat.

Devised by: Dirk Cieslak, Gerko Egert, Stefan Hölscher, and Netta Weiser.

Public Research is part of the program gesellschaften in the new and beautiful House of Commons, designed by Olf Kreisel at Vierte Welt.

With support of Senatsverwaltung für Kultur und Europa, Berlin.

Contact | gesellschaften@viertewelt.de  

ARCHIPELAGO ARCHIVES EXHIBIT #0: About Archipelago Archives

gesellschaften | Zoom Meeting

 
About Archipelago Archives

By Kiran Kumar

Do. 25.06.20 | 18:00 – 22:00 | online 17:45

_EN

 

The long-term artistic research project Archipelago Archives (2106-date), initiated by Kiran Kumar, is an emancipatory gesture of (re)imagining dances danced on an imaginary archipelago somewhere in the Indian Ocean. By studying practices of yoga, tantra, temple dance and music in South and South-East Asia, the archives offer artistic counterproposals to dominant Eurocentric understandings of being human in the world. In the wake of mounting questions of ecology, feminism and decoloniality in our present moment of modernity, the archives are an urgent investigation of both historically pre-modern and contemporary non-modern Indic cultures. Through a perspective of looking-at-from-within, this circuitously titled presentation will describe the iterative methods of investigation and publication inherent to this artistic research project through a collaged reading of excerpts from a series of essays that constitute the project’s current output.

Kiran Kumar (b.1983, Bangalore) is an interdisciplinary artist, researcher and writer. His work focuses on unpacking understandings of the human body-mind through a trifold practice of dance as art, science and ritual, and on the proposals for change that these understandings hold for our contemporary world. His artistic works have ranged from performance, video, installation and exhibition, to writing and archiving. Research fellowships include the Berlin Centre for Advanced Studies in Arts and Sciences (2016-18), Volkswagen Foundation’s Arts & Science in Motion program (2016-19), Academy for Theatre and Digitality (2021) and Akademie Schloss Solitude (2021).

Sessions are held in English but other languages are welcome. Translation is our common duty.

 
 Devised by: Dirk CieslakGerko EgertStefan Hölscher, and Netta Weiser.

Public Research is part of the program gesellschaften in the new and beautiful House of Commons, designed by Olf Kreisel at Vierte Welt.

With support of Senatsverwaltung für Kultur und Europa, Berlin.

Image: Unidentified Photograph, Rekso Pustako Mangkunegaran, Surakarta, Indonesia, undated. 

Animist Humanism: Thinking With African Indigenous Religions

Online Veranstaltung

 

Animist Humanism: Thinking With African Indigenous Religions

By Patrice Haynes, Liverpool Hope University

Fr. 22. May. 2020 | 18:00 – 22:00 / Online 17:45

_EN

Decolonial theorists such as Aimé Céssaire and Sylvia Wynter argue that a new model of the human is needed if the humanism of colonial modernity, which dignifies European Man alone, is to be overcome. As part of a wider effort to decolonise and diversify philosophy (particularly philosophy of religion), this presentation turns to the resources of African indigenous religions in order to reimagine the human otherwise. A key feature of African philosophy is a conception of the human as inherently communal, famously captured by the term ‘ubuntu’: ‘I am, because we are’.

In this presentation, I sketch what I call an ‘animist humanism’ in order to capture the African understanding of the human as one who necessarily exists in a web of relations with other human beings as well as ‘others’ in both the non-human, visible world and the invisible world of ancestors, spirits and the divine. By highlighting the animist cosmology underpinning African accounts of the human I hope to address the criticisms of those such as Kai Horsthemke who argue that the anthropocentric character of African indigenous religions fail to recognise satisfactorily the value of non-human animals and the natural environment more widely. Nevertheless, I acknowledge that the prevalence of animal sacrifice in indigenous African religiosity seems to be at odds with an animist humanism that values life-enhancing relations with others, human and non-human. After examining the significance of blood and ritual animal sacrifice in African indigenous religions, I suggest that an animist humanism underpinned by an African cosmo-sense needs new ceremonies that give visceral expression to an existential problematic facing humanity in the shadow of colonial modernity and the era of the Anthropocene: ‘What will we attend to and, thereby, give life’?

We are looking forward to the conversation with our guest from Liverpool.

Biography

Patrice Haynes is a Senior Lecturer in Philosophy at Liverpool Hope University. Her research interests focus primarily on issues in philosophy of religion, particularly as these are reframed by continental, feminist and decolonial philosophies. Her first monograph, titled Immanent Transcendence: Reconfiguring Materialism in Continental Philosophy, was published by Bloomsbury in 2012. She is currently undertaking research for her second monograph which aims to challenge the Eurocentric focus of philosophy of religion by considering how a focus on African (particularly West and Southern Africa) indigenous religions can point to the field’s constructive transformation beyond its colonial legacy. She is a co-founder of the Association of Continental Philosophy of Religion.

Sessions are held in English but other languages are welcome. Translation is our common duty.

Devised by: Dirk CieslakGerko EgertStefan Hölscher, and Netta Weiser.

Public Research is part of the program gesellschaften in the new and beautiful House of Commons, designed by Olf Kreisel at Vierte Welt.

With support of Senatsverwaltung für Kultur und Europa, Berlin.

Impossible practices of sensation: performative reading and discussion revolving around Saidiya Hartman’s notions of freedom and self-ownership

Online Veranstaltung

 

Impossible practices of sensation: 

Presented by Joseph Barker

16. April. 2020 | 18:00 – 22:00 / Online 17:45

_EN

In the previous session of Public Research we discussed the work of Saidiya Hartman, examining her method of critical fabulation as a writing practice traversing the academic and the artistic, and by doing so opening up new spaces and modes of engagement with critical writing which are both rigorous, poignant, vivid and affective.

Aiming to continue our interrogation of Hartman’s methodologies and explore hybrid modes of transmission and discussion that her work might generate, our upcoming session will open with a performative reading by Joseph Barker, followed by a close reading of short pieces of text by the authors intertwined within the performance: Saidiya Hartman and Pierre Klossowski (see attached link).


This is how Joe describes his performance “Erotic Hereotopias”:

This performative reading focuses on the queer experiments that African-American feminist historian Saidiya Hartman’s analyses in the formation of the ghetto in the early twentieth century America. It opens up these queer, anarchist experiments in living by bringing them into constellation with earlier erotic utopias and distopias. In particular, Pierre Klossowski’s take on the Sadian abolition of self-ownership and Charles Fourier’s utopia of a free, non-economic exchange of sensation. Between the binding violence and the impossible freedom of these practices of sensation, the reading finds a path of escape in the constrained experimentation that Hartman celebrates. Alongside the more theoretical and poetic intertwinings, the sonic dimension of the performance rhythmically upsets any overly-formalistic tendencies of the voice, while the somatic dimension of the choreography ruptures the separation of language from lived experience.

Text!

In these Dropbox links you can find selected reading by Pierre Klossowski, Sade and Fourier, and Saidiya Hartman, extract from Beautiful Lives, Wayward Experiments

Please try to read the attached texts before our meeting. If you are not able to do so time-wise you can of course join us nevertheless. 


Sessions are held in English but other languages are welcome. Translation is our common duty.

Devised by: Dirk CieslakGerko EgertStefan Hölscher, and Netta Weiser.

Public Research is part of the program gesellschaften in the new and beautiful House of Commons, designed by Olf Kreisel at Vierte Welt.

With support of Senatsverwaltung für Kultur und Europa, Berlin.

“The Anarchy of Colored Girls Assembled in a Riotous Manner”

Reading Session

 

“The Anarchy of Colored Girls Assembled in a Riotous Manner”

Saidiya Hartman:

Do 20. Feb. 2020 | 18:00 – 22:00

_EN

“The method is critical fabulation.” (Saidiya Hartman)

In December we discussed Sylvia Winter’s “1492: A New World View” and the impact the conquest of the Americas had on the foundations of the world. 1492 changed the political order as much as the ontological and epistemology order, it impacted on spiritual and religious practices and the position “man” had in all these systems.

In the upcoming session we want to follow up on this discussion and address colonialism’s and colonial politics’ impact on method. How are the methods we are working with part of the ongoing colonial structures that saturate our thinking and acting? By following Saidiya Hartman’s proposition for a “critical speculation” we want to ask how methods can be set to work in a decolonial manner? How can one counter-investigate the past? How does the method of fabulation challenge the dominant discourse and its claim to the only facticity possible?

Since its beginning, Public Research is interested in challenging the separation of academic and artistic practices. Hartman’s text crosses these realms elegantly and interweaves them in an important and rigorous manner. It shows the political necessity implied in such an endeavor and offers us to embark on the journey of research called fabulation.

Together we will read and discuss Saidiya Hartman’s “The Anarchy of Colored Girls Assembled in a Riotous Manner”

Please try to read the text before our meeting. If you are not able to do so time-wise you can of course join us nevertheless. Sessions are held in English but other languages are welcome. Translation is our common duty.

You have no access to the text? Do not hesitate to send a mail to gesellschaften@viertewelt.de

It is our pleasure to share our copy with you (25 pages) .

For legal reasons we cannot put the text online.

 

 Screenshot, blackink.info 

Devised by: Dirk CieslakGerko EgertStefan Hölscher, and Netta Weiser.

Public Research is part of the program gesellschaften in the new and beautiful House of Commons, designed by Olf Kreisel at Vierte Welt.

With support of Senatsverwaltung für Kultur und Europa, Berlin.

“1492: A New World View”

Reading Session

 

“1492: A New World View”

Sylvia Wynter #2:

Do 17. Dez 2019

_EN

“How to envision a system, then, that would no longer follow a biocentric naturally selected/dysselected bioevolutionary teleological logic and necessitates accumulation, but rather engenders a worldview and outlook, reconceptualized, in new meta-Darwinian terms, from the ecumenically human hybrid perspective of our Third Event origin as a species as homo narrans?” Sylvia Wynter and Katherine McKittrick 2015

After we learned at our last meeting from Sylvia Wynter that behind the so-called anthropocene stands not “the human” as a species but a certain genre of the human that was born in the province of Europe during the transition from the middle ages to modern times and since then has been spreading replicatorily throughout the entire planet in the course of colonial history, transforming it into a globe, in the next session we want to turn to another text by her from the 1990s.

In December we will discuss “1492: A New World View”, an essay written on the occasion of the more than ambivalent anniversary in 1992 of the conquest of the Americas by Columbus and other white European men, which raises the question in how far this event is related to current debates about an imminent climate catastrophe. The leading question in this context will be to what extent Europe’s colonial history of several hundred years already represents a first ecological catastrophe, in the context of which MAN1 first decided at the end of the 15th century who belonged to humanity and who did not and since the 19th century MAN2 finally interlinked biology and economics in such a way that today it seems almost impossible to imagine other genres of the human outside of homo economicus, although this is exactly what it should be all about.

“Can we therefore, while taking as our point of departure both the ecosystemic and global sociosystemic ‘interrelatedness’ of our contemporary situation, put forward a new world view of 1492 from the perspective of the species, and with reference to the interests of its well-being, rather than from the partial perspectives, and with reference to the necessarily partial interests, of both celebrants and dissidents? The central thesis of this essay is that we can.” Sylvia Wynter 1995  https://kupdf.net/queue/sylvia-wynter-1492-a-new-world-view_59f8bb34e2b6f5287a8c9454_pdf?queue_id=-1&x=1576745227&z=Mi4yMDUuNjkuMTU4

A short interpretation of Wynter´s conception of the human from a posthumanist perspective by Birgit M. Kaiser and Kathrin Thiele is online as well:

https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/pdf/10.1080/13534645.2017.1374510

Please try to read Wynter´s essay before our meeting. If you are not able to do so time-wise you can of course join us nevertheless. Sessions are held in English but other languages are welcome. Translation is our common duty.

Bild: Dióscoro Puebla: Primer desembarco de Cristóbal Colón en América. 1862. Óleo sobre lienzo, 330 x 545 cm. Museo del Prado / screenshot: www.foroxerbar.com / copyright OA

 

Devised by: Dirk CieslakGerko EgertStefan Hölscher, and Netta Weiser.

Public Research is part of the program gesellschaften in the new and beautiful House of Commons, designed by Olf Kreisel at Vierte Welt.

With support of Senatsverwaltung für Kultur und Europa, Berlin.

“Unparalleled Catastrophe for Our Species? Or, to Give Humanness a Different Future: Conversations”

gesellschaften 

“Unparalleled Catastrophe for Our Species? Or, to Give Humanness a Different Future: Conversations”

On Sylvia Wynter and Katherine McKittrick:

Do. 21.11.19 | 18:00 – 22:00

_EN

 

After Nafiseh Fathollahzadeh and Dirk Cieslak took us on a journey between Zentrum Kreuzberg, Tehran, Addis Ababa, Tapiola/Espo, and Rome in the last session and we realized that these places require a reconfiguration of our urban imagination. In the frame of our next meeting we are going to ask what kind of human beings inhabit today’s cities and where the image of man they correspond to comes from.

Against this background we will turn to the Caribbean thinker Sylvia Wynter, whose decades-long investigation of colonial history is still to be discovered in depth. Wynter assumes that since 1492 a “monohumanism” born in Europe has been spreading over the entire planet and replicated itself everywhere at the expense of other ways of being human. In the “genre of the human” she calls “man”, which not only inhabits the global metropolises of the present, Wynter sees the “westernized bourgeoisie’s (neo)Liberal-humanist homo oeconomicus”. This genre of the human encompasses many color lines nowadays and declares itself to be “the class of classes of being human itself”.

In a longer dialogue Wynter has been conducting with Katherine McKittrick since 2007 under the title “Unparalleled Catastrophe for Our Species? Or, to Give Humanness a Different Future: Conversations”, the two attempt to trace the current ecological crisis, which more and more clearly turns out as a climate catastrophe, back to Europe´s monohumanism – involving monoculturalism since the early plantations of colonialism as well – and to show ways out with regard to the urgent (re-)introduction of other genres of being human.

On the 21st of November we will therefore read extracts of the conversation between Wynter and McKittrick and think them through together: How far can we not only reconfigure our urban imagination but also imagine other human genres? Being human as praxis instead of as a noun? We will start at 6 p.m. on page 18 and see how far we can get together by 10 p.m. The whole book, containing “Unparalleled Catastrophe for Our Species?“, can be found here:

http://joshualubinlevy.com/uploads/3/5/3/6/35367669/katherine-mckittrick-sylvia-wynter-on-being-human-as-praxis.pdf

 

If you have time to take a look beforehand: Great! If not: Also fine! No prior knowledge required. Everyone is welcome. See you soon.

 

Mix Cloud audio link to Decolonality London: e.g. “No Humans Involved” An Open Letter to my Colleagues by Sylvia Wynter

 

Devised by: Dirk CieslakGerko EgertStefan Hölscher, and Netta Weiser.

With support of Senatsverwaltung für Kultur und Europa, Berlin

 

Reconfiguring urban imagination

Do. 17.10.2019 | 18:00 – 22:00 Eintritt frei | Free Admission

_EN

In the previous session of Public Research we discussed visual archives and narratives of nation which were scattered, lost, or displaced, and are in recent years reclaimed by artistic practices. During the session we questioned the entanglement of these practices with notions of identity and self-determination, and examined them as acts of de/ reterritorialization.

In the upcoming session we will unfold the notion of the “nomadic archive”, which was at the center of the previous session, by introducing two artistic projects taking the performativity of memory as a presupposition and urban research as their strategy.

Nafiseh Fathollahzadeh will present “Momentography of a failure”, a collaborative photography and urban research project. This project seeks to develop the concept of participatory citizenship through practicing forms of appropriation, collaborative research, and participatory photography. “Momentography of a failure” approaches the urban edges to explore spatial transformations of urban landscapes through photography, the participation of locals and activating collective memories of those spaces. This practice invests in the performativity of the medium by creating and speculating the image-reality of urban spaces which could ultimately be a practice for the right of appropriation through image and text.

Dirk Cieslak will present the BLOCK project which starts with a claim: We – the inhabitants of blocks around the world – live in the ruins of post-war Fortschritts-Moderne. The time has come to imagine and realize masterplans of rebuilding, inventing new forms of living in the city. Through performance, performative guided tours and film, this nomadic project explores specific blocks around the globe; examine their history as artefacts of utopian modernism of the 1960, and their current existent as mute spaces appropriated by their actual residents.

Travelling between Zentrum Kreuzberg, Teheran, Addis Ababa, Tapiola/Espo, and Rom, in this session we will negotiate urban research as a site for the production of fiction, facts, spatial memories and new alliances. Connecting seemingly detached spaces and transforming sites into places- we will keep on asking – who owns the city?

public research is part of the program gesellschaften in the new House of Commons at Vierte Welt.

Devised by: Dirk CieslakGerko EgertStefan Hölscher, and Netta Weiser.

With support of Senatsverwaltung für Kultur und Europa, Berlin.

Nomadic Archives & Narratives of Nation: In Search of lost/destroyed Narratives

A conversation between Shirin Assa and Sapir Hubermann

 

Mo. 16.09.2019 | 19:00 – 22:00 Eintritt frei | Free Admission

_EN

The “Palestinian Film Unit” (PFU) was a collective of filmmakers and researchers founded in the 1960s, who engaged in the production of films and documentaries within the framework of the “Third Cinema movement” (in Spanish: Tercer Cine). During the Lebanese Civil War in 1982, the PFU archive was bombed, and most of the archival materials were destroyed. Only a few films that were sent to film festivals in Europe and the Arab world survived. In recent decades, one can observe the phenomenon of second-generation Palestinians working with or on the lost materials of the PFU. A conversation between Shirin Assa and Sapir Hubermann, this talk focuses on such films and art productions that relate to the original materials of the PFU and examines the intersections of film aesthetics and decolonization movements, narratives of nations, and in a further step, the entanglements thereof to subject formation and discussions around identity.

 

 

Bio Note

 

Shirin Assa holds PhD position at the department of English studies and Anglophone Literatures at University of Bayreuth. Her PhD project is focused on “intersectional resistance” which deals with the resistance of intersectional identities of MENA women in Diaspora. Shirin is a board member of the research association Future Migration. Network for Cultural Diversity and cospokesperson of Gender, Queer, Intersectionality and Diversity network of University of Bayreuth.

Sapir Huberman is a Ph.D. Candidate at the International Ph.D. Program (IPP), Literature and Cultural Studies, Justus Liebig University, Gießen. Her research deals with visual archival

material and narratives which are scattered, lost, looted or displaced. She also holds an M.A in Art Theory and Art is Public Space from Weissensee Art

 

Academy, Berlin, and works, in parallel to her research, as an independent curator, cultural manager and art mediator in different institutions.  

 

public research is part of the program gesellschaften in the new House of Commons at Vierte Welt.

Devised by: Dirk CieslakGerko EgertStefan Hölscher, and Netta Weiser.

With support of Senatsverwaltung für Kultur und Europa, Berlin.